David Christensen, Detroit Personal Injury Lawyer

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David E. Christensen founded Christensen Law in 2014 to give clients the individualized attention that they need after serious accidents.

“I really enjoy taking care of people,” he says. “I like slaying large corporations on their behalf and protecting them when their lives are destroyed.”

A native of California, Christensen has a bachelor’s degree in international relations from San Francisco State University. He obtained both his master’s degree and his law degree from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. After first handling corporate legal matters, he became interested in personal injury law and worked at a large firm for about two decades before branching out on his own.

“With a large volume firm, you can’t have close relationships with clients,” he says. “The number one complaint about personal injury attorneys is poor communication. … No client is ever going to complain about that with us.”

The firm’s principles of client service are proudly displayed on the wall at the Christensen Law offices: Listen. Protect. Win.

At Christensen Law, the attorneys and staff listen to clients to understand their circumstances, stresses, and any questions they may have. “We try to protect them – take over managing the medical care, try to relieve their burdens and carry them for them,” Christensen says.

The dedicated attorneys also aim to win maximum judgments and settlements for their clients to alleviate future distress. “We make sure this case provides them with the compensation they need and will need. We want to safeguard their future and give them that security.”

Christensen has a top-notch reputation in Michigan when it comes to personal injury, auto accident, and brain injury cases. He holds an “AV Preeminent” rating from the respected legal network Martindale-Hubbell, recognizing him for the highest legal ability and ethical standards. He has been ranked as one of U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Lawyers” since 2012 and was named “Lawyer of the Year” for 2019 for representing plaintiffs in Detroit in personal injury litigation.

In addition, Christensen was one of only 25 attorneys in 2012 to be named a “Leader in the Law” by Michigan Lawyers Weekly. He also has been recognized as one of the top 100 lawyers in Michigan and top 50 consumer lawyers in Michigan.

In one of his impressive victories, Christensen secured the state’s largest jury trial award for a traffic crash ─ $17.8 million in damages ─ after a severe truck vs. car accident left his client with a traumatic brain injury. Plaintiff Vaylma Dorado expressed her sincere appreciation during the trial. “The jury’s verdict made it possible for me to have closure, have a new outlook on my life, start the real healing process, let go of the anger and ultimately, allowed me to see the silver lining,” she said during the trial in 2014.

Christensen doesn’t just look out for his firm’s clients. He was chairman of the State Bar of Michigan’s Negligence Law Section and was an officer on the Executive Board of the Michigan Association for Justice, where he also chaired the no-fault committee for many years. He also has testified before the Michigan legislature against bills that would weaken Michigan’s protections of injured motorists and has spoken at state and national conferences about negligence and auto accident law.

The Ann Arbor resident is active in the community as well. Christensen has been a member of the nonprofit citizens group Washtenaw Council on Alcoholism, the board of directors for Spectrum Prevention Services in Ann Arbor, and chairman of the board of trustees for HelpSource Agency in Washtenaw County, a private nonprofit serving people with substance abuse problems, teen mothers, and abused children.

When not in court, Christensen is an avid marathoner and backcountry skier who enjoys spending time with his family.

He relishes blending his experience and compassion to assist clients in their times of need. “You’re kind of taking on the system and beating it, and bettering people’s lives in the process,” he says.